Pajero 4WD Club of Victoria Public Forum Pajero 4WD Club of Victoria Public Forum

Go Back   Pajero 4WD Club of Victoria Public Forum > Vehicles > Generation 4-2 Pajero

Generation 4-2 Pajero NT model 2009 - 2011

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 22-08-17
SilverTrevally SilverTrevally is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 28
Default

Thinking of putting 2 Provent catchcans in series. What do you think?
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 22-08-17
aussieintas's Avatar
aussieintas aussieintas is offline
Valued Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Sorell, Tasmania
Posts: 1,369
Default

My thoughts are not sure if 2 would provide any extra benefit.
__________________
2008 NS X SWB DiD auto in cool silver, Pirelli Scorpion ATR's, MCC bull bar with Stedi Summit fog/DRL's, Airtec(TJM) snorkel.

Previously
88 NF SWB 2.6 manual
92 NH LWB 3.0 auto
92 NH J-Top 2.5 manual
95 NJ SWB 3.0 auto
99 Cruiser 4.5 manual with all the fruit
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 22-08-17
ReefMaster ReefMaster is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Tarneit VIC
Posts: 87
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dicko1 View Post
This is the answer you want....

Purpose of your Stock PCV System:
The PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) system is designed to regulate and remove fumes from the engine crankcase, and to alleviate crankcase pressure which could cause oil leaks or seal damage. It’s a way for gases to escape in a controlled manner from the crankcase of an internal combustion engine.
During normal operation of an internal combustion engine, there’s a compressed air and fuel mixture inside the combustion chamber that is ignited and as a result, forces the piston down. A small amount of that ignited mixture leaks past the piston rings and ends up in the crankcase. This leakage is often referred to as “blow-by” (leakage past the piston rings), as well as oil mist.
Some of the oil mist and other products settle along the engine intake and over time form a “gunk.” The oil catch can collects the oil mist and condenses the fuel vapors while allowing “cleaner” gases to be passed back into the intake. Typically the blow-by gasses are passed through a wire mesh, which give the vapor droplets something to adhere to. Since the oil catch cans condense the vapor portion of the gasses, they will need to be drained periodically of all the oil, fuel and other contaminants.
In addition to the air/fuel mixture and oil mist, there’s also the possibility of condensation, or water droplets. Condensation is more susceptible in humid climates, but it can exist anywhere there is fluctuation in temperatures in a hot to cold environment.
If these contaminates are kept inside the combustion chamber, they will eventually make their way into the oil inside the crankcase and cause oil contamination and dilution or make their way back into the intake manifold.
This problem has been around forever. In the past, engines were equipped with breathers that would allow the crankcase to “breath”. The addition of these breathers resulted in moderate engine life improvement. However, it was not until the engine’s crankcase was fitted with a vent or evacuation tube that major improvements were experienced.

A PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) system exists to help counter this problem and expel the gases out of the crankcase and back into the intake manifold. Because the intake manifold is at a lower pressure than the crankcase, suction is created keeping the PCV system going. On engines equipped with a turbocharger, a check valve is sometimes used to prevent pressurizing the crankcase during boost.








First there was nothing more than plain breathers to allow excess crankcase pressure to be released or vented. But the damage from not “flushing” all the gasses out resulted in very short engine life (of course the oils of that day were nothing like the protection today’s synthetics provide) so the next change added a vent tube, or evacuation tube that ran from the top of the crankcase to low on the car where the air streaming past would create a suction, or vacuum that would pull the vapors out and vent them directly into the air with a breather (barely filtered with a wire mesh type media that was oiled to catch dust & dirt) allowing the “fresh” makeup air in to complete the flushing process. Now this resulted in greatly increased engine life, but as the motors got worn oil would start to drip out the tube and drip onto the roadways, then the rain would wash it into the ditches, where it would enter the ground water (you know the rest of the EPA story) and the gasses just vented to the air.
As the EPA and the powers that be mandated stricter emission laws the system was refined more and more ultimately evolving into what we have today. A completely sealed system that uses the vacuum provided by the intake manifold to draw these vapors out, and the filtered fresh makeup air is drawn from the main air intake system and filtered by the main air filter. This results in very clean emissions, but the unintended issues are the detonation or “knock” that occurs when oil is introduced into the combustion chamber that the knock sensors pick up (before we can hear it) and pull timing to protect the engine from damage, and thus reduced power. Another result is the carbon buildup on the valves & piston tops (any techs reading this can surely verify the amount) also resulting in decreased performance and less power made.
The purpose of a proper oil separating catch can is to route these gasses through a baffle system that provides the most contact possible with the outer surface resulting in the oil being trapped and removed from the other gasses that do continue on through the intake and are burnt and consumed. It does NOTHING else in ANY way to the engine oil itself….it can’t.
Not all Catch Cans are created equally! Often imitated, never duplicated. Most Catch Cans on the market are just comprised of an empty container with 2 ports. While that simple design may trap a few oil droplets, a well-engineered Catch Can is designed to condense the oil vapor and trap the oil inside the container. CatchCan
A test proven design incorporates a stainless steel mesh and screening mechanism that acts like a maze to collect and condense the oil vapor. Once the oil vapors condense into liquid droplets, it falls to the bottom of the can. In addition, the top assembly is specially designed to keep any liquid from climbing out the exit hole during aggressive driving conditions. You will be amazed by how much oil a well designed and engineered Catch Can will catch! Don’t settle for an empty can without any internal baffles and collection systems. The lack of an effective baffle system allow oil to be pulled directly through the intake manifold.
In comparison, the “O-Reilly” or “Autozone” oil separator, it will, and does catch a small amount of the oil but the majority still gets past into the intake.
Why don’t the auto manufacturers incorporate something similar? Cost and the added maintenance was deemed something that would NOT be accepted by the general market (even though it is as simple as draining the can at each oil change).
Bottom line is this: The OEM system does a great job of meeting emission standards and removing the harmful contaminants, but the unintended consequences are the oil that is drawn into the intake charge. For an engine to produce the maximum amount of energy per explosion (of the A/F in the combustion chamber) you want air & fuel only….any amount of oil in this mix will hamper the explosion resulting in less energy released, detonation, and carbon buildup. Trapping and removing this oil before it gets into the combustion chamber is the ONLY solution to maintaining the maximum efficiency and prevent excess carbon buildup. A correctly designed and installed Oil Catch Can solves this problem.
Wow , that is convincing , I better get a catchcan.
__________________
2010 NT Pajero Exceed

Koni Raid 90 series Lovells HD/ Koni Raid 88 Kings KCRR-35HDSP. Front & Rear ARB diff lockers/18inch CSA Jackals on Atturo Trail Blade MT 275/65/18. Full Bushkinz/SAFARI snorkel/ARB Deluxe Bar & Runva 11XP/GME TX4500S/
Piranha Dual Battery system /UL80-VO AGM battery/ Gista 160W Solar Panel/36 inch 480W LED Light bar/Kings Awning and Awning tent/9inch 185W Led/ LRA tank
Wants: a roof tent/ exhaust/drawers
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 22-08-17
ReefMaster ReefMaster is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Tarneit VIC
Posts: 87
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverTrevally View Post
Which is better HPD with the stainless steel gauze or the Provent with the fibrefilter ? The HPD steel gauze just doesn't look effective enough and the Provent filters looks more efficient.
The second question is which kit is complete and will allow easy install with the correct brackets and hoses?
__________________
2010 NT Pajero Exceed

Koni Raid 90 series Lovells HD/ Koni Raid 88 Kings KCRR-35HDSP. Front & Rear ARB diff lockers/18inch CSA Jackals on Atturo Trail Blade MT 275/65/18. Full Bushkinz/SAFARI snorkel/ARB Deluxe Bar & Runva 11XP/GME TX4500S/
Piranha Dual Battery system /UL80-VO AGM battery/ Gista 160W Solar Panel/36 inch 480W LED Light bar/Kings Awning and Awning tent/9inch 185W Led/ LRA tank
Wants: a roof tent/ exhaust/drawers
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 23-08-17
Seigried Seigried is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: brisbane
Posts: 384
Default

Several users on the forum have made there own brackets. See this thread for an example https://www2.pajeroclub.com.au/forum...ad.php?t=57962

I also made my own using the bunnings prepainted black version. Buying the provent200 without hoses and brackets saved me about $100 after i bought brackets and hoses etc.

You can mount them in series but i would recommend this: clean the air intake pipework as best you can before installation. Once you have installed the catch can drive around for awhile (a couple 100ks) and then check the air intake hoses again. They should have dried/no oil in them. If it is wet you have a problem with either the install or somthing else, in which case a series install may help thought i would seek advice first.

Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk

Last edited by Seigried; 23-08-17 at 10:33 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 23-08-17
hardie hardie is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Mandurah WA
Posts: 100
Default

Just had HPD Catch Can fitted. $385 for can, $15 freight, $55 Labour $455 in total

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8X2CuFVO3E4
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 23-08-17
rotare rotare is offline
Valued Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 887
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
The reason, I reckon, that MMAL don't fit catch cans is the same reason that other manufacturers don't. It is all about costs of manufacture.
I reckon it has less to do about the added cost of manufacture (high volume, mass produced unit would cost next to nothing), and more to do with the added cost of servicing, ensuring the vehicle complies to emissions regulations and minimising of warranty claims.

If a catch can was fitted to the car factory, then it would be just another item that would need regular servicing by the vehicle manufacturer and regularly checked by the owner to ensure it was correctly functioning. If the filter blocks or the catch can is not drained of oil there could be a chance that crankcase fumes / oil escapes from the engine or interferes with the function of the antipollution system, or creates a build up of crankcase pressures resulting in damage to seals and gaskets, which could lead to warranty claims.

Why bother with any of that hassle when the manufacturer can just simply deal with the problem by feeding the fumes back through the engine
__________________
2013 NW VRX
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 04-07-18
Doowrag's Avatar
Doowrag Doowrag is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Gympie Qld
Posts: 217
Default

Had my Intake Manifold cleaned last week and just fitted the ProVent Catch Can. The clean was $550 and the can $285 delivered from Western Filters. Highly recommend the ProVent kit, came with all fittings, everything lined up, 1/2 hour to install.
I've noticed an immediate improvement in fuel economy getting down to 7.9L/100km on the highway.
__________________
2011 NT GLX - Coopers, 2in Kings/Oztec, SmartBra, Lightbar, Warn XD9000, UHF, Flat Rack, Awning, RedArc Dual Battery System, Engel... LOOKING TO BUY FACTORY SIDE STEPS...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
PVC catch can/or no catch can 02-SR5 PB -PC Challenger 2009 - 2014 3 10-08-14 09:14 AM
Egr and oil catch can DonnyMac General Info 7 27-04-14 08:40 AM
Catch can? greig PB -PC Challenger 2009 - 2014 34 12-12-13 07:25 AM
Oil catch can 02-SR5 PB -PC Challenger 2009 - 2014 2 17-12-11 03:22 PM
Installing catch can and blocking EGR questions. awill4wd Generation 4-1 Pajero 12 11-10-10 12:28 AM


All times are GMT +10. The time now is 12:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.