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Generation 2 Pajero NH - NL Models 1991 - 2000

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  #11  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
Jasonmc73 Jasonmc73 is offline
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Originally Posted by disco stu View Post
New bolt $25 through mitsubishi. Wouldn't sell me the part without a vin though, which bugged the crap out of me. Apparantly they can't just look up parts, they need vin number to find parts. Stupid system that no aftermarket parts shop needs to use. Luckily I found an old photo of compliance plates I had so could order it on the way home.

I asked about oiling bolt etc in the workshop while I was there. Head guy reckoned just to use locktite no oil. But then I'm always a bit cynical about mechanics, and half of the crank bolts that came out were from dealership mechanics anyway......
I sold parts for many years in my yester life, may seem stupid, but build lists change within the same model from time to time, the VIN in A cars instance or year & serial number in other instances helps A lot to avoid wrong parts.
Can be quite A chore to send back if one can at all, wrongly sourced parts & some are actually none return.
It also isnt A high paying job so it could be possible your not dealing with Einstein, systems need to be in place to reduce errors, hence systems need certain info or wont play the game! Less guessing is achieved.

Aftermarket do get it wrong, working after market for A decade their science is not so exact
When I was A lad in trade school we tested at TAFE head bolts dry & oiled under head of bolt only.
Remarkable difference in clamping pressures achieved with slight oil under head, reduces friction, better clamp.
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  #12  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
disco stu disco stu is online now
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Don't talk logic to me Jason!! You make some good points there, I should be more easygoing about this sort of thing. I just wanted to order the damn thing

Sounds good about the oiling the head, I'll do that with the threadlock
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  #13  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
erad erad is offline
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Disco Stu:
One thing you should consider when thinking about threadlock is getting the damned bolt out when you need to at a later date. I have read the above comments about using or not using threadlock, but Mitsubishi specify a tightening torque which is very high, and my opinion for what it is worth is that you should use only light machine oil, and definitely do it under the face of the bolt head as well. Removing the bolt can be hard - almost impossible in fact. One of my belt changes on my wife's TF Magna, I tried to undo the bolt with a breaker bar but the engine kept winding up on the engine mounts. I had my wife with her foot on the brakes and the whole thing in gear. I asked her to hit the starter so that I could get a better starting point to pull the bar on, but forgot that I had not disconnected anything at that stage. She turned the starter and the engine fired. Luckily I was nowhere near the breaker bar. There was a WHACK and the engine was idling smoothly with the breaker bar hanging loosely in a vertical position. Bolt undone! Never again....

I know that you can probably heat the bolt a bit to loosen the threadlock but this is an extra complication. The huge pre-tension on the bolt is designed to overcome any forces which undo the bolt anyway. Light machine oil should do the job.
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fisherman4life fisherman4life is offline
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  #15  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
fisherman4life fisherman4life is offline
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Originally Posted by disco stu View Post
Don't talk logic to me Jason!! You make some good points there, I should be more easygoing about this sort of thing. I just wanted to order the damn thing

Sounds good about the oiling the head, I'll do that with the threadlock
make sure you put a medium strength thread lock on so the if you ever need to undo it its not impossible.

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  #16  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
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Dicko1 Dicko1 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erad View Post
Disco Stu:
One thing you should consider when thinking about threadlock is getting the damned bolt out when you need to at a later date. I have read the above comments about using or not using threadlock, but Mitsubishi specify a tightening torque which is very high, and my opinion for what it is worth is that you should use only light machine oil, and definitely do it under the face of the bolt head as well. Removing the bolt can be hard - almost impossible in fact. One of my belt changes on my wife's TF Magna, I tried to undo the bolt with a breaker bar but the engine kept winding up on the engine mounts. I had my wife with her foot on the brakes and the whole thing in gear. I asked her to hit the starter so that I could get a better starting point to pull the bar on, but forgot that I had not disconnected anything at that stage. She turned the starter and the engine fired. Luckily I was nowhere near the breaker bar. There was a WHACK and the engine was idling smoothly with the breaker bar hanging loosely in a vertical position. Bolt undone! Never again....

I know that you can probably heat the bolt a bit to loosen the threadlock but this is an extra complication. The huge pre-tension on the bolt is designed to overcome any forces which undo the bolt anyway. Light machine oil should do the job.

Bugger....would have been a great you tube clip....

lucky man
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  #17  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
disco stu disco stu is online now
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Cheers Erad. My only thinking is that I'm guessing at least half those that did come undone would have been done up to torque and still come undone. Maybe without oiling the thread though.

Bit of an oops moment! Luckily it turned it alright though
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  #18  
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erad erad is offline
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Stu:
Most likely, the ones which failed weren't tightened to the proper torque. The required torque is quite high and the space 5o torque the bolt is rather limited.

Bolt torque is designed to ensure that the pre-load onthe bolt is greater than the service fluctuations in bolt tension. In this way, the tension always exceeds the normal operational loads on the bolt and therefore the bolt is not subjected to fatigue loading.
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  #19  
Old 4 Weeks Ago
disco stu disco stu is online now
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I would think you're right, but I'm just not keen on taking risks given the amount of issues people have had. I know its not a common issue with Toyota V6's for example, and they have the same sort of set up as far as minimal room to get back up to torque etc.
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